(Source: wif2, via politicalsexkitten)

(Source: detectivetrap, via hello-mint-deactivated20140901)


Cassiopeia to Andromeda by Dan Watt

Cassiopeia to Andromeda by Dan Watt

(Source: afro-dominicano)

(Source: jawlined, via elb-cat)

"The key, I believe, for pulling yourself out of the limbo of not knowing who you are or not embracing who you are, is to love something enough to not care. Sometimes it takes us a long time to find it. There are so many things out there, there’s so much nuance to being human beings, it sometimes takes a really long time to locate it"

Joanna Newsom (via baroqueue)

(via doyouwaitformethere)

vacillavi:

I’m so happy.

(via white-tea)

omame:

新東名経由で由比へゴー|美味しそうな写真を撮りたい

omame:

新東名経由で由比へゴー|美味しそうな写真を撮りたい

(via cumawo)

(Source: earlyware, via anearlymorningwalk)

vivyllons:

The bookstore in my town has a racism section in honor of Ferguson and it gives me a lot of hope

vivyllons:

The bookstore in my town has a racism section in honor of Ferguson and it gives me a lot of hope

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

"Don’t explain. People only hear what they want to hear."

Paulo Coelho (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

feelknower1993:

it’s so weird that learning about racism is totally a completely optional side quest for white people

(via politicalsexkitten)

aseaofquotes:

Edouard Levé, Suicide

aseaofquotes:

Edouard Levé, Suicide

(Source: aseaofquotes)

(Source: verycoolandveryinteresting, via politicalsexkitten)


  Traces of One of Universe’s First Stars Detected
  
  An ancient star in the halo surrounding the Milky Way galaxy appears to contain traces of material released by the death of one of the universe’s first stars, a new study reports.
  
  The chemical signature of the ancient star suggests that it incorporated material blasted into space by a supernova explosion that marked the death of a huge star in the early universe — one that may have been 200 times more massive than the sun.
  
  "The impact of very-massive stars and their explosions on subsequent star formation and galaxy formation should be significant," lead author Wako Aoki, of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, told Space.com by email.

Traces of One of Universe’s First Stars Detected

An ancient star in the halo surrounding the Milky Way galaxy appears to contain traces of material released by the death of one of the universe’s first stars, a new study reports.

The chemical signature of the ancient star suggests that it incorporated material blasted into space by a supernova explosion that marked the death of a huge star in the early universe — one that may have been 200 times more massive than the sun.

"The impact of very-massive stars and their explosions on subsequent star formation and galaxy formation should be significant," lead author Wako Aoki, of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, told Space.com by email.

(via afro-dominicano)